International Women’s Day 2020

28Feb - by Angelika - 0 - In Uncategorised

Fempower.tech invite you to join them at their International Women’s Day celebrations in 2020 on the 9th of March at 5:30pm at The Catalyst at Newcastle University.

Fempower.tech are an international network and collective of feminist researchers, practitioners, and activists working with digital technologies. They aim to raise awareness of feminist issues in technology research by being overtly critical and political within the field, raising voices of underrepresented groups and topics, presenting tangible outcomes, and taking on an activist role for this. They create supportive and collaborative environments in their workplaces, within academia, industry, and at international conferences.

Fempower.tech work across disciplines and institutions, welcoming all who identify as feminists and do work related to technologies. We are always looking to join up with new networks and individuals, so please do have a look at our website (https://fempower.tech/), follow us on twitter (@fempowertech), or get in touch with Angelika Strohmayer directly (angelika.strohmayer@northumbria.ac.uk) if you’d like to get in touch!

Working with the North East & Yorkshire Film Archives, we present “What About the Women?” after an introduction by the programme’s curator, Julie Ballands. After the film, we will be joined by a panel of women who will reflect on the film in relation to their own activism and work in the North East context.

”What About the Women?’ presented by the North East & Yorkshire Film Archives

Be astonished, mesmerized, entertained or enraged by footage that reflects how women have been portrayed on film in our archive collections. Taken from regional film collections of non-fiction material; from local advertising companies, cine clubs, amateur and professional footage recording life across the North East and Yorkshire over the past 100 years, the films reflect how women have been represented on screen over the decades – sometimes powerfully, but sometimes slipping into the stereotypical sexist clichés of the times.

Featuring footage from some classic Tyne Tees documentaries, including Road to Blaydon following women living through slum clearances in the 60s in the Newcastle’s west end and Briefing: Miner’s Wives, catching up with politically organised women from County Durham a year after the 84/85 miners’ strike, to kitsch promotional films pitched at ‘women’s interests’ and culminating in Born A Rebel, a rousing short using footage from our film archives to commemorate 100 years of northern women on film and the centenary of (some) women having the vote. Born a Rebel was commissioned by Cinema for All in 2018.

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